ANTOFAGASTA, CHILE (SUNDAY, JULY 14th, 2019): COMPLETE MORRETINO DOMINATION. SUZUKI NARROWLY DEFEATS SARI OHARA. JERICCO ROSERO TAKES THE PRO JUNIOR WIN.

 

The final day of competition at La Cupola for the Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival was a day of explosive bodyboarding and the next defining step in Sammy Morretino’s (HAWAII) claim on the 2019 world title.

The conditions were near perfect throughout the entire day, with clean 2 – 3 metre long-period swell rolling along the reef, providing the remaining competitors with ample opportunities to perform and continue their campaigns.

COMPLETE MORRETINO DOMINATION

The final of the ABF Men’s division was a match-up between the two standout performers of the entire event, Sammy Morretino (HAWAII) and Diego Cabrera (CANARY ISLANDS). Both riders entered the water for their final in scintillating form following devastating semi-final performances where both Morretino and Cabrera earned combined heat score totals of 16.25 and 16.15 against Uri Valadao (BRAZIL) and Maxime Castillo (FRANCE). These combined heat score totals were the norm for these two riders throughout the event, and it really was an even match-up in the final.

 

The prone final was in the hands of Diego Cabrera early, after he launched another of his trademark backflips to earn himself 8 points to build on an earlier score of 5 points. This all happened in the first 10 minutes of the heat, leaving Morretino in need of two scores to get back in the heat. This first opportunity came when Morretino launched a clean invert on a smaller wave on the lefthander at La Cupola to earn him a 5.75, but with Cabrera now holding priority, it was necessary for Morretino to think outside the box.

‘Outside of the box’ meant venturing deep at La Cupola and finding a clean righthand wave to get a better score, something that had not really been contemplated by other riders throughout the event and which resulted in Morretino building his heat score total with an even bigger invert than the previous ride. This decision to take a shorter righthand wave for the score meant that Morretino could get back out to the peak quicker than Cabrera and gain priority, which became a critical factor in what happened next.

What happened next, and with only 5 minutes remaining in the final, will go down in history. Morretino stroked into a wave at La Cupola that broke deep on the reef and had a long wall extended out before him. Cabrera was paddling back out after taking a ride under priority which only offered him an average section to launch an invert off. What was offered to Morretino was of a higher quality and he simply did what he had done all event – fly high. Morretino launched a lofty invert that saw him travel many metres through the air and land way out in the flats. The crowd and Morretino knew that this would be enough to take the lead and it was only time and opportunity that would stand in the way of Morretino claiming victory.

The clock counted down and the opportunities did not present themselves to Cabrera and in the end it was Morretino who would be victorious.

 

Clearly elated with his victory, Morretino only had an hour to enjoy the taste of it before heading back out to the water for a dropknee final against good friend and fellow Hawaiian Mack Crilley.

In the dropknee final, it was Morretino who was first to draw blood, posting an average score for a small cover up and a few nice turns on the end part of the wave. Crilley was quick to respond, on his backhand, dropping in late and laying out three solid carves before taking a lip-line and floating over the shallow end section. It was a quality display and took him to the lead. Crilley quickly backed this score up with another solid turn in the pocket to stay ahead of Morretino.

Morretino decided to head back to the righthander that served him well in his prone heat to find a backside ride to earn some points and did find a clean face to throw spray into the channel and build his total. But it was back on the left where Morretino would get what he needed, finding a larger set wave and taking himself to the top with a re-entry to air drop followed by a carve that saw him awarded 8.25 and the lead. Minutes later Morretino was able to put the nail in the coffin after another set wave that opened up for him along the inside section saw him deep in the barrel and coming out with the spit. He finished this ride off with another clean turn and the judges gave him an 8.5 for his efforts.

The heat was now his to hold on to and Mack Crilley’s to try and steal back, which almost did happen after Crilley found some deep tube time on his backhand but was unable to hold onto the turn at the end for the full score. Had he been able to hold it, who knows what might have happened? He did need a 9.86, and riding a tube like La Cupola is hard enough laying down, let alone backside dropknee…

But the day remained Morretino’s, seeing him once again return to shore victorious thanking his sponsors for their support, the event organizers and dedicating his victories to his mother who passed away when he was younger and another friend who recently passed away. He not only performed like a champion but his approach on land in victory was also that of a true champion.

It will be interesting to see if Morretino can continue this form into the final event of the South American leg in Arica next week.

 

SUZUKI NARROWLY DEFEATS SARI OHARA AND JAPAN HAS A WORLD TITLE RACE

There is a rivalry between Japanese competitors Ayaka Suzuki and Sari Ohara, and it is now looking likely to define the world title race this year. Both riders had narrow victories in their semi finals against Joana Schenker (PORTUGAL) and Isabel Sousa (BRAZIL) and their final was also a very hotly contested heat.

The final between Suzuki and Ohara was mostly down to wave selection and who could find the bigger waves to perform on. Even though Ohara certainly put together some good rides and completed her maneuvers well, it really was Suzuki’s ability to attract the larger set waves that was the real difference. One ride in the final in particular that defined this difference was that of Suzuki, who stroked into a set at La Cupola and launched a huge rollo on the outside section that was completed perfectly.

The challenge for Ohara to get back in the heat and put some pressure on Suzuki was not one of ability but simply wave selection. The final scores saw less than 2 points’ difference between the two riders, highlighting the importance of wave selection AND the completion of rides to a high standard in competition.

Suzuki was elated with her victory and Ohara was visibly disappointed following the final. Suzuki dedicated her victory to the event organizers for putting on such a great event while Ohara goes back to the drawing board to figure out and learn about how to win critical heats like this in the future.

The positive for both of these great riders is that the race is on, and they are in it. This will be an exciting year for the two Japanese riders.

JERICCO ROSERO TAKES THE PRO JUNIOR WIN FOR ECUADOR

For most of the Pro Junior heats it has been all about the ‘Silva Brothers’ from Iquique, who have been thoroughly disrupting the Open Men’s heats and have been dominant in Pro Junior heats in Iquique and also Antofagasta. But it was not their time to claim victory today, that glory went to the sole Ecuadorean rider in the event, Jericco Rosero (ECUADOR) who was able to overcome the dynamic duo with simply beautiful inverts out of the bowl at La Cupola.

There was something refreshing about Rosero’s approach to the final. With most heats typically dominated by flips of all shapes and sizes, to see a young rider draw out long bottom turns and launch such clean and perfectly executed inverts was beautiful to watch. The judges liked it too, seeing Rosero with a combined heat score total of 14.75 in the end.

Everyone was talkin’ about the Silvas, but it seems like Rosero is the one to watch when the Pro Junior World Championship takes place in Viana later this year.

WHAT’S NEXT?

What’s next? Arica of course! Tune in to APB social media for all the action!

SPANISH

Japón, E.E.U.U Y Ecuador se consagraron como los países monarcas del Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival 2019

La atleta nipona retuvo el título del año pasado al vencer a su compatriota Sari Ohhara. Mientras que Morretino se subió al pódium como el mejor de todos en las categorías Open Pro y Drop Knee. Y en la categoría Junior, el ecuatoriano Jericco Rosero fue el campeón.

Ayer se vivió la última jornada del Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival, la cual comenzó con la semifinal de la categoría Drop Knee. En esta modalidad se encontraban dos riders nacionales; Leonardo Alar de Iquique y el local Manuel Cepeda. El oriundo de la tierra de campeones perdió su llave ante el hawaiano Mac Crilley. Y el representante de la Perla del Norte fue eliminado a manos de otro hawaiano, Sammy Morretino.

Morretino llegó hasta el último día del campeonato mundial con buenas actuaciones, siempre exhibiendo su poderío arriba de su nave y dominando olas de tres a cuatro metros. En dos finales estuvo presente el joven deportista de 22 años, la primera que compitió fue la modalidad Open Pro, donde venció con grandes maniobras áreas al atleta proveniente de Islas Canarias, Diego Cabrera.

Por otra parte, el piloto hawaiano estuvo presente en la finalísima de Drop Knee. En esta ronda enfrentó a su amigo y coterráneo Mac Crilley. Una definición ajustada fue lo que presenciaron todos los asistentes en la Playa Llacolen, pero Morretino sacó a relucir toda su jerarquía en la ola “Cúpula de Poder” y se consagró como monarca del ABFChile 2019.

En cuanto al podio de los Open Pro, la primera ubicación fue para Morretino, el segundo lugar para Diego Cabrera, la tercera posición para el brasileño Uri Vadalao y el cuarto lugar para el francés Maxime Castillo. Y en la modalidad Drop Knee, el hawaiano Morretino fue el mejor, seguido en la segunda plaza por Mac Crilley, la tercera posición fue para el antofagastino Manuel Cepeda y el cuarto puesto para el iquiqueño Leonardo Alar.

Ayaka Suzuki: Bicampeona de Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival

Así como fue el año pasado, la carismática atleta volvió a quedarse con el primer lugar del certamen en la modalidad de damas. Para revalidar el título, Ayaka Suzuki derrotó en semis a Joana Schenker.

En la final, la nipona se enfrentó a su amiga y compatriota Sari Ohhara, quien eliminó en semis a unas de las favoritas del campeonato, la brasileña Isabela Souza. En cuanto al duelo de japonesas, Suzuki se consagró como bicampeona del certamen al vencer a su amiga por una mínima diferencia de 1.35 puntos.

Por lo tanto, Ohhara se quedó con el segundo lugar, Isabela Souza en el tercer lugar y Joana Schenker en la cuarta posición.

 

 

El oro Pro Junior se fue a Ecuador

La final de los más jóvenes del circuito mundial, se desarrolló con cuatro sudamericanos. Dos chilenos; Rodrigo y Moisés Silva, el trasandino Nahuel Benavides y el ecuatoriano Jericco Rosero.

El atleta proveniente de la mitad del mundo se consagró como el mejor en los Junior, el segundo lugar fue para el ariqueño Rodrigo Silva, y el tercer lugar fue para su hermano Moisés Silva.

Una vez obtenido el título, el nobel campeón de la categoría Pro Junnior, Jericco Rosero, señaló que “espero que con este triunfo el bodyboard de Ecuador pueda mejorar y mostrarse de una mejor manera al mundo”.

Cuando culminó la competencia del Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival, se vivió una verdadera fiesta en la playa Llacolén. Bandas locales hicieron vibrar con buena música a todos los presentes y cerró la fiesta el destacado artista nacional Drefquila, quien con su trap hizo disfrutar a miles de jóvenes en el cierre del ABF2019.

FETURIS

En la última jornada de la Feria Internacional de Emprendimiento, Turismo e Innovación Social (FETURIS), los niños y niñas pertenecientes el proyecto social “Campamento de Ideas”, visitaron el escenario del Antofagasta Bodyboard Festival (ABF) y compartieron con deportistas donde conocieron los detalles de la producción del evento internacional.

 

Asimismo, la destacada rider puertorriqueña Luz Grande, realizó una exposición didáctica enfocada en el deporte y el medio ambiente. “Para mí es un privilegio tener la oportunidad de compartir mi experiencia con los más pequeños, ya que es nuestra obligación entregarles las herramientas y conocimientos para que puedan cumplir sus sueños”.

 

Para los organizadores del evento, FETURIS cumplió ampliamente con las expectativas de vincular el turismo con los emprendedores sociales de la Región de Antofagasta y esperan repetir la experiencia el próximo año.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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